Bunions aren’t the only sign that something may be amiss in your body’s alignment or overall health.

If you have any of these nine foot symptoms, be sure to get them checked out with your podiatrist or orthopedic surgeon. Thank you to HealthCentral.com for the original article.

1.  No hair on your feet or toes (who knew!): possible poor circulation

2.  A persistent sore on your foot: risk of diabetes

3.  Cold feet: potential thyroid issue or poor circulation

4.  Thick yellow toenails: fungus

5.  An enlarged big toe: gout

6.  Numbness in both feet: peripheral neuropathy (most common causes are diabetes and alcohol)

7.  Pitted toenails: psoriasis

8.  Shooting pain in the heel: plantar fasciitis

They left out one very important sign. BUNIONS

9.  Bunions: postural alignment and back problems

If bunions are your main concern and you’re considering surgery or worried about the recovery process, or you’re looking for the best bunion doctor, you can learn more by reading Bunion Survivor’s Guide to Successful Bunion Surgery and Recovery.

Take care and remember to take care of your feet.

 

*This site does not offer personal medical advice and is solely informational in nature.

 

YogaToes_Buy_Now

YogaToes are one of my favorite gifts to give anyone with bunions. In fact, I love them so much, I’m wearing mine right now as I write and have used them for seven years. YogaToes truly are a “vacation for the feet.” Click on the link below and get $10 off on each pair ordered.  They come in many wonderful colors and a “Sport” version so have fun choosing a pair for all your loved ones.

Buy Patented YogaToes® Today! Save $10 with Coupon Code: TOES10

PS. When you get to the website, be sure to read the Yoga Toes testimonials from the LA Dodger’s trainer Sue Falsone, The Washington Ballet, and the singer Sia. Very cool. They really do work!

Buy Patented YogaToes® Today! Save $10 with Coupon Code: TOES10

Oprah Winfrey goes shopping in fluffy frog slippers (photo courtesy of DailyMail.co.ukIf it’s good enough for Oprah, it’s good enough for Bunion Survivors! When I saw these photos of Oprah wearing these “fluffy frog slippers,” had made it to the Daily Mail, I knew I had to share this article with you to remind you to honor your bunioned feet and when they hurt, try slippers that make you smile.

She may be worth billions of dollars but even Oprah Winfrey opts for comfort over style occasionally.

The 58-year-old hit a designer clothes store in New York City today sporting a pair of fluffy frog slippers.

Below are a pair of fluffy froggy slippers similar to the ones that Oprah is wearing shopping.  The holidays are coming. Treat yourself to a pair and give them as a gift to a friend who you want to smile when she thinks of you.

If you’re getting ready to have bunion surgery or are in recovery, these slippers will be comfortable and fun to wear once you’re out of your protective boot.

If you have a pair of beloved slippers, email me a photo of you wearing them and I’ll post. In the meantime, I’m going to get myself a new pair of slippers!

 

Mary, your book is a life saver.
Can’t imagine how I would have had courage
to go forward with surgery without your book.”
~ Virginia R. ~

Bunion Survivor's Guide to Bunion Surgery & Recovery

Bunion Survivor’s Guide to Successful Bunion Surgery and Recovery ebook includes:

* Preparation checklists for before and after bunion surgery to reduce stress and make life easier for you

* Guidelines to select the right surgeon for you

* 3 critical questions to ask your doctor that most people won’t think to ask or are too afraid to ask, but make all the difference in a successful surgeon and surgery (this alone is worth the price of the book and your insurance premium and deductible combined!)

* Over 100 recovery tips, shoes brands and styles, and bunion relief resources with website links

* An instantly downloadable ebook that you can read online or print out and read at your convenience on the couch, in bed, while you’re waiting at your doctor’s office.

Learn more at Bunion Survivor’s Guide to Successful Bunion Surgery and Recovery.

Mary

PS. If you’re still living with bunion pain and are still afraid of surgery, this ebook can help you make the right decision for you at the right time with the right doctor. Be good to yourself. You and your feet are worth it.

“Oh, Mary, thanks for being such a delight.
I have passed word around to others to purchase your ebook before surgery. My new left foot is a miracle. Sept. 24 was surgery, and having such a successful surgery is a dream that came true.”
~ Virginia R. ~

Bunion Survivor’s Guide to Successful Bunion Surgery and Recovery

This site does not offer personal medical advice and is solely informational in nature.

As part of my commitment to you as a subscriber of BunionSurvivor.com, I am always researching different forums and websites to stay current with the best ways to help you free your feet and inspire your spirit.

This week I learned that the doctor who did my bunion surgery, whom I reported in my blog and ebook to be an excellent surgeon but arrogant and disrespectful back in 2006, and bordering on negligent in the way he responded to me during consultations, had his license suspended in 2007 and was put on probation for 8 years for negligence. I hadn’t reported him, nor did it occur to me to do so. But someone else did and it was serious enough to be taken seriously.


MEDICAL BOARD REVIEW   If you need to check out your doctor and you live in California, you can do a search on the California Medical Board website with your doctor’s name and if there’s been a medical review issue, you will find it. (Thank goodness for all the high-integrity physicians serving us, but it is shocking to see how many doctors are listed for medical suspensions and reprimands.) This service is also available in other states.ACTION STEPS   I don’t know about you, but if I learned about this kind of documented information about a physician I has previously considered but hadn’t used yet, I would not use him no matter how great of a surgeon s/he was. If I was in dire straits and had no other option for a surgeon due to location or insurance or finances, I would not move forward unless I had a one-on-one face-to-face conversation about the situation with the surgeon and talked to at least three of his most current clients and felt in my gut that this person had changed their ways. (I do believe people can change given enough reason and support socially and spiritually.)

This is why having a list of questions is so important! In my special report “25 Questions To Ask Your Bunion Surgeon Before Scheduling Bunion Surgery,” there are three questions (#23-25) that address this issue and were added because of my concerns even prior to learning about my doctor’s medical suspension. I urge you to ACT NOW if you’re considering having surgery and ASK THE QUESTIONS to get the best results for yourself. Your health and your life could depend on it. 

These last three questions are not for the faint of heart, however, they will ensure that you have as much information as possible before you make your decision and they will give you a sense of your surgeon’s professionalism. Take a deep breath and remember this is your feet and life we’re talking about keeping healthy. You are worth it!

23.    What is the safety record in the past year of the facility where I will have my surgery?

    24.    Have you had any malpractice suits against you or medical reprimands? How long ago? What were the issues? What were the outcomes?

    25.    When things haven’t worked out or you’ve had an unhappy patient, how have you handled it?

If you’d like this special report with all “25 Questions to Ask Your Bunion Surgeon  for free as well as 2 other important bunion health reports, check out my “Bunion Survivor’s Guide to Successful Bunion Surgery and Recovery.”
As always, I welcome your comments. Here’s to your happy, healthy feet! Mary
PS. In addition to the 25 Questions List, get my ebook and you’ll also receive a Bunion Surgery and Recovery Planning Month-by-Month Checklist  so you don’t end up stressing about what you should have done and can relax and heal successfully after surgery. You can get all this with my ebook “Bunion Survivor’s Guide to Successful Bunion Surgery and Recovery.” There’s no risk – if you don’t find at least one helpful idea, return it within 30 days for a full refund. Guaranteed.

Have you had or do you have any back pain along with your bunions? Please comment below if you have.

I’ve wondered if the occasional lower back pain and sciatica that became chronic a few months after bunion surgery on my right foot and continues today is connected to the misalignment of my feet. All the doctors I’ve seen say it’s not but I’m not so sure.

A friend shared the book Healing Back Pain by John Sarno, MD, which I started reading today. Sarno says that most back pain (and many other muscular, organ, and immune system issues) can be attributed to TMS (Tension Myositis Syndrome), which he defines as a psychosomatic issue that becomes physical as a way to hide negative emotions from your conscious mind, in particular repressed anger, because you’re not ready to or think you can’t handle the pain.

Interesting idea and even more interesting when I consider the possibility that maybe I’m subconsciously angry that I have bunions and felt I had no option but to have surgery to get rid of the pain (that and every other transgression from childhood :-). Hmmm…and the solution, Dr. Sarno? Recognize the anger, find a healthy way to express repressed emotions, keep moving your body, and in 98% of situations the pain will subside.

What’s your experience with bunions and back pain? Have you read Dr. Sarno’s book yet?

Click on the photo to learn more about the book Healing Back Pain by Dr. John Sarno

If you’re worried about having bunion surgery, what about experimenting beforehand with a fish-eating pedicure? No, not eating fish while having a pedicure; having a pedicure where fish actually eat away the dead skin on your feet. Maybe they’ll eat away the bunion too. It can’t be any worse than trying honey and turmeric to dissolve bunions I’ve heard mention of, can it?

Before you think I’ve gone off the deep end (haha, into a pool of dead-skin eating fish — not!), just know that as you look for answers and treatment regarding your bunions, two of your most important daily treatments are feeding your sense of humor and taking stress-relief actions.

It’s so easy to feel frustrated, depressed, and hopeless when you’re feeling bunion pain and exploring bunion treatment options or recovering from bunion surgery. It’s also easy, when you train your mind, to gift yourself with moments of humor and stress relief on the journey.

Read this story and watch the short video and it’s guaranteed to make you laugh, and if you’re game and visit this Alexandria, Virginia foot spa, a few fish to your feet.

Read more on Fish Pedicures in USA Today.

2016 Update: Fish pedicures have been banned in California and other areas. Buyer beware. Read more.

Question from Diane: I’m told I’ll be off work for a 1 week, then sitting at work for 2 weeks. What is the actual recovery time? My job is marketing at a hospital for a nursing home. A lot of walking. I’m very active.

Answer from Smiling Walker: Recovery time, from everyone I’ve talked with, as cliché as it sounds, is different for everyone, but within a range. My surgeon said 4-6 weeks before you’re walking without effort, and my 2nd opinion doctor said 6-8 weeks before full pressure on your foot and up to 1 year before the foot resolves into its new pattern.

I can tell you this, I pushed the envelope with walking, and I’m paying the price. My doctor said if I followed his rules exactly, I’d have no problems. I’ve had problems with slow healing and more swelling than normal, which they’re attributing to too much time on my feet too soon. I gradually built up from the 10 minutes per hour the first week to 20 minutes the second week, and in the third week, I felt so good I went out for a one hour walk (very slowly) and I think that’s when I may have created more inflammation and slowed the bone growth.

Inflammation is a big concern with healing, and that can show up as redness, swelling, but more curiously to me, as heat on the foot. The idea is to keep the foot cool and quiet. If I were to do it over, I’d have spent less time walking around and more time with my foot elevated those first three weeks. My concern was losing cardiovascular strength while laying around. Now I know that I could have done upper body and core exercises while keeping my feet quiet (but part of me was relieved not to feel compelled to exercise during that time. Rest is good.

It’s challenging because you’ll feel fine and your foot is so tightly bound and the screw is holding things in place that you think you can run a marathon (well, not quite, but you’ll understand once you’re in recovery).

When I went back for my 2 month checkup, I compared feet with women in the waiting room. One woman had no pain, was in a tennis shoe and was walking normally at six weeks. I was still very swollen and experiencing pain, but again, had two procedures, while she had only one. Another woman was back in for a second surgery on the same foot from three years earlier with a different doctor because the bunion had grown back and she was still feeling pain.

I’ve learned a lot since deciding on bunion surgery and one thing I can tell you for sure is that the foot is an amazing gift that I overlooked for too long and a much more complex living organism than I ever anticipated that affects EVERYTHING you do.

If this insight was helpful to you, I’d love to know how it helped you. And do let me know what you decide, how the surgery goes, and if you have more questions, be sure to email me.

Bunion Survivor’s Ebook Guide to
Successful Bunion Surgery Recovery

Question from Diane: I will have bunion surgery on Friday on my left foot. It’s had problems of blisters and pain. The right is not as bad. So I planned on just repairing the left first. Please give me some tips on preventing the next surgery or should I just have it done at the same time?

Smiling Walker: I wish I had all the answers for you. Here’s my experience and what I learned:

Both my surgeon and 2nd opinion doctor advised against both feet at the same time. Both have done surgeries on people who had both feet done. I have spoken to four women who had both feet done at the same time.

Woman #1, a good friend, said it wasn’t a problem physically. She just shuffled on crutches at her job (she’s a teacher) for several weeks. She was married at the time with two preteens and said she got little help from the family, which made it difficult. She also only had problems with the big toe bunions.

Woman #2 said she was a busy, active woman with two teenage children and a husband and couldn’t waste the time off her feet doing one foot at a time. She demanded her doctor do both or she’d find another doctor. He did it. She said she slid on her butt in the house for a month and crawled with her feet up for a few weeks after that, but then it was over and she was back on her feet running (literally – she is a runner). She said it helped that her children waited on her or she would have been left to the dogs. It’s been two years and she says her feet are not “big boob” pretty, but they work.

Woman #3 (#2’s sister) is also a busy woman, but single. Her experience was very painful and difficult. She attributes this to not having the support system to help her while she was recovering. She recommends one foot at time to anyone who asks.

Woman #4 is a mom of three boys now, but was single at the time she had her bunions removed. She said her fiancé did everything for her for a month. She didn’t walk on her feet the entire time except to go the bathroom, and like #2, she crawled with feet up. She said it was really hard to follow instructions, but she did. It’s been 20 years and she has had no problems. She, like Woman #2, is very active – a fitness trainer.
She also said that she did weekly physical therapy recommended by her doctor (mine didn’t recommend this, which I found odd) and felt that helped her tremendously.

I considered doing both feet because of the time factor, but talked myself out of double foot surgery for several reasons and only did my right foot, which was causing a lot of pain.

  1. I am single and a self-employed professional speaker who is on my feet for hours at a time, I didn’t have the financial or social support to be off my feet for 4-6 weeks or the extra downtime if I had complications.
  2. Because both docs were so against double foot surgery, I decided there must be something to that. They both said I needed the other foot for balance and walking and without it if there were problems, I’d have more complications. After the cynic in me thought they might just want more business, I decided I’d rather have a happy surgeon cutting on my foot than someone who was energetically stressing because I might not follow post-recovery protocol and end up with complications that could affect their business.
  3. I didn’t have pain in my left foot and the docs had said to use surgery as a last resort. This made sense to me because technology is changing so quickly so who knows what new techniques they could have in the next decade.
  4. I met several alternative healers who said that with exercise and focused visualization I could at the very least prevent the left foot from getting worse and at best, perhaps even reverse the bunion. (That fell in the miracle category for me, but I’m open. <smiling>

In retrospect, post surgery, I made the right decision for me to do one foot at a time. I should also mention that I had two “procedures” on my right foot – bunion surgery and hammertoe surgery on the 2nd toe, because I let things go too long (I didn’t know I should have seen a podiatrist in my teens. I’ve had complications with my right foot that I’ve addressed on my blog.

Regarding preventing the next surgery, what I’ve learned is that podiatrist-fitted orthotics (range $250-$600) can, in some cases, prevent bunions from getting worse, so that could be a good option. I’m guessing your doctor will recommend them. I have them now and while I’m noticing slightly less pain on the pad of my right foot, there is still pain. Also, I’m flat footed and do notice arch support and that my ankles are not caving inside (called pronating) as much when I walk.

I’m not sure what you should do, nor would I tell you since I’m not a doctor, however, I do believe you already know the answer for yourself.

One of the ideas I’m working with when I don’t know what to do is to choose conscious non-action and ask for a clear answer in my meditations, which eventually comes, sometimes only at the moment when I’m forced to make a choice. I also ask my foot (or whatever body part is in pain) what it wants. May sound crazy, but that dialogue has connected me more with my body and healing.

Best wishes on a successful surgery!

I just got next week’s issue of U.S. News and World Report. There’s a great article on “50 Ways to Improve Your Life.” I couldn’t help but notice #3: Lose the shoes.

Everywhere I go now that I’ve come out of the shoe closet about my bunion and hammertoe surgery, I meet women who share their bunion stories, and are still wearing shoes “to die for.”

Cameron Diaz was on “Ellen” and came out wearing heels that were were as tall as the ten story buildings she jumped over in Charlie’s Angels. Six-inch heels! It doesn’t look like Cameron has bunions, and I’m not sure if Ellen does, but I can tell you that no matter how cute those shoes were, there is no way anyone who has had bunion surgery (at least my kind of bunion surgery) would ever get near those shoes for more than a minute.

Ellen asked to try the shoes on, shuffled precariously a few inches and said, “Um, tell me why you want to wear these again?” Cameron laughed and said, “Because they’re fun.” “Yeah, right,” Ellen said, “Fun for who?”

Oprah shared one of her most painful secrets (I posted on this November 1, 2006) — she wears her beautifully stylish high heeled shoes only on the set because they hurt so much. She takes the elevator down to the studio in bare feet, put on the shoes just before she walks out, and then takes them off again immediately after.

I’ve “been there, done that,” but now after B.S. (bunion surgery), my body actually begins to shudder, my teeth clench, and my eyes wince when I even think about wearing anything other than my athletic shoes. I accidentally left my dress shoes at a Christmas party last Saturday night. Fifteen minutes into the party I switched from the Donald Pliner stretchy-fabric, low-heeled pumps, which are as comfortable as they come, at least pre-surgery, into my sturdy leather J. Crew sandals I brought along “just in case.”

Ahhhhh. How do you spell relief? “Lose the shoes.”

“The good news” Dr. Robin Ross, a podiatrist in NY is quoted as saying, “is that the pointy shoe is heading more toward the rounded toe box.”For a list of bunion shoe brands and styles, check out:

Bunion Survivor’s Ebook Guide to
Successful Bunion Surgery & Recovery